Brexit means…higher prices

THE economic arguments for and against Brexit in the course of the referendum campaign were quite esoteric and confusing to the average voter. Similarly, sterling’s decline in the currency markets might seem like the kind of thing that only concerns City traders.

So the row that has broken out between Tesco, Britain’s biggest supermarket chain, and Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch multinational, has made the story concrete in ways that were not apparent before. Unilever wants to raise prices across a range of goods to reflect the fall in the pound, which has dropped from around $1.50 on the day of the referendum to less than $1.22 at the time of writing. Similar falls have been seen against the euro; indeed travellers who change their money at the airport are getting less than a euro per pound.

The row has centered on Marmite, a salty yeast-based spread that is loved by some, but not all, Britons including this blogger. (I have yet to meet an American who can stand it.) But Marmite isn’t the best example as it is made in this country. PG Tips, one of Britain’s favourite tea brands (pictured), is a better example; that is…Continue reading

This post was originally published in the Economist.

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Brexit means…higher prices

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